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Moving One Image into Another Image

By Mike Rodriguez  ·  May 23rd, 2011

In our latest “quick tips” video, Mike Rodriguez shows you three ways to move one image into another image or other file inside Photoshop Elements:

  1. By using the Place command;
  2. By dragging from the Project Bin; or
  3. By dragging between open windows with the Move tool.

When dragging, don’t forget that you can use the Shift key to place the dragged file exactly in the center of the other image/file.

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10 Replies to Moving One Image into Another Image:

  1. Lee

    May 23, 2011 at 4:17 am

    Thanks for the “heads-up” on the Place command. I always appreciate being introduced to commands and features I haven’t noticed.

    Also, I’m glad to hear about “smart objects”. I’d like to find out more about those.

    • Mike

      May 23, 2011 at 9:54 am

      You’re very welcome, Lee. Glad to help out. Regarding Smart Objects, don’t get too excited. There are some 3rd-party plugins that will give Elements more functionality in that area, but, Smart Objects are largely a feature in the full version of Photoshop. Elements uses them for kicking off things like the Place command, but that’s about where they stop (without a plugin).

    • B l

      December 6, 2011 at 1:31 pm

      No one has commented lately so I will…thanks!

  2. Howard

    May 25, 2011 at 10:06 am

    Thanks for the tutorial. I was not familiar with the Place command.
    Also, thanks for the reminder that holding down the shift key while moving an object will center it onto the image. Saves a great deal of time over using the rulers!

  3. Brian

    May 28, 2011 at 4:34 pm

    Very good, thank you- Is there a way to resize multiple images to match prior to merging them?

    • George

      December 24, 2011 at 9:18 pm

      Here is my method: With all the images open, go to Window>Images>Cascade then Match Zoom.

  4. Clarke

    May 29, 2011 at 1:30 pm

    Mike,,,this is probably one of the most important tutorials I have ever seen, and I can only wish it had appeared four or five years ago when I began with PSE!!! For some reason, it was always assumed everyone knew how one image was moved into another. In many cases tutorials simply said “move the image of the dog onto the image of the cat” BOOM. Not a word was offered as to how this is done!!! I learned how only by taking a PET course (I wish you all still offered them) by I think Scott Kelby. Really…this is one of the most profound problems newbies have with Elements. I think for completeness I would add the “copy and paste” method, although I realize you were doing a “quick tips” tutorial. Great job Clarke

  5. marilyn

    June 26, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    I always appreciate the quality of these videos! That being said, I would like to know why you’d use one method over another. I’ve always just dragged from the Project Bin, which is totally easy. But there must be situations where one of the other methods would be preferable. It could be a part two of this video!

  6. Alfred

    February 6, 2012 at 3:10 pm

    Hi Mike,
    ……………once again you have come up trumps and found something else that i didnt know that i found very interesting, and which promises to be useful in the future…a great video and explanation, thanks :Ben”

  7. Verneitta

    April 24, 2012 at 7:41 am

    Thanks a lot. I really do appreciate the info.

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